Blog

 
Learning from Listening

There are many benefits in listening to the repertoire you are working on, on disc and in concert, as well as “listening around” the music – works from the same period by the same composer, and works by his/her contemporaries. [...] more >>

by Frances Wilson
August 20th, 2017
 
Darwin Leonard Prakash: The Young Indian Opera Prodigy

The Summer of 2014 proved to be a wholly exciting and life changing time for Darwin Leonard Prakash, a young Indian boy living in New Delhi who has a fascination with the human voice and the Western idiom of singing [...] more >>

by Serenade
August 20th, 2017
 
Forgotten Pianists: Robert Casadesus

The Casadesus family produced a number of outstanding musicians: Henri (1879-1947), a violist and music publisher; Marius (1892-1981), a violinist and composer; Gaby (1901-1999), pianist and teacher; and Jean (1927-1972), a pianist. The one we’re going to look at, however, [...] more >>

by Maureen Buja
August 16th, 2017
 
William Kentridge turns Salzburg’s new Wozzeck into a Gesamtkunstwerk

Salzburg doesn’t fear difficult opera. And Alban Berg’s Wozzeck certainly qualifies as one. Infrequently performed on more conventional stages because of the inaccessible music and distressing storyline, Salzburg embraced it wholeheartedly, both musically and visually.

by Philip Eisenbeiss
August 13th, 2017
 
Wigmore Hall: London’s Sacred Shoe-Box

Opened on 31 May 1901, Wigmore Hall, nestling unobtrusively just a stone’s throw from the bustle and litter of Oxford Street in a row of tall Edwardian façades, is London’s pre-eminent venue for chamber music, song recitals and solo piano [...] more >>

by Frances Wilson
August 13th, 2017
 
Salzburg: Giuseppe Verdi’s Aida by Shirin Neshat

The Salzburg music festival’s new director Markus Hinterhaeuser boldly outlined the motto of this year’s program as ‘power’: “strategies of power, its disgraces and horrors, but also with the ability to forgive.” With this bold declaration Hinterhaeuser possibly tried to [...] more >>

by Philip Eisenbeiss
August 11th, 2017
 
The Perils of Perfectionism

“Practise makes perfect” – that oft-quoted phrase beloved of instrumental teachers the world over… It’s a neat little mantra, but one that can have serious and potentially long-lasting negative effects if taken too literally.

by Frances Wilson
August 6th, 2017
 
Split Personality On practising and performing

As performing musicians we have to develop a split personality. This somewhat schizophrenic state (or states) of being has to do with our need to understand and appreciate the difference between practising and performing.

by Frances Wilson
August 1st, 2017